Dr. 2 with patient How Do You Say, Hola? by Art Por Diaz

 
2 insignia.png
 
multimedia.png

Patient: How Do You Say, Hola?

Legal Guardian: Art Por Diaz

Insurance: Bookmarx Medical

Symptoms: Awkward abuelo, slow internet connection, language apathy

Diagnosis: Lingua Ignorantia


Patient Description:

Mr. Diaz’s reoccurring plot clay is the cultural divide between Mexico and America. I saw myself as the ignorant youth flicking vocab words through google translate in language learning apathy. Currently learning Portuguese, I always feel dutiful in my daily effort. Modern selfishness sometimes keep us from accessing the familial bonds of the past and present. 


5 stars.jpg

Dr. 2 with patient A La Roro by Art Por Diaz

 
2 insignia.png
 
Spooky.png

Patient: A La Roro

Legal Guardian: Art Por Diaz

Insurance: Bookmarx Medical

Symptoms: political pus, Mexican-American vertigo

Diagnosis: Hypersensitive closet creature phobia


Patient Description:

This political play innocently captures the Mexican-American divide and debate. The monsters and their funny technicalities made a vivid short story. I don’t see why this can’t turn into a full one act. Why not get more monsters? Why not involve a U.N.I.C.O.R.N. representative over the phone to settle the matter of who’s going to be crawling under the bed tonight?


5 stars.jpg

Dr. 2 with patient All Good Children Go To Heaven

 
2 insignia.png
 
hand-from-heaven.png

Patient: All Good Children Go to Heaven

Legal Guardian: M.E.H. LEWIS & Barbara Lhota

Insurance: PagePay Plus

Symptoms: Holy headaches, back alley blues

Diagnosis: Fatherly fervor


Patient Description:

Christians pay taxes, but still their children go to Hell if they aren't baptized promptly and exactly. Well balanced religious plays are my favorite. The legal guardians use the patient to live through the paradox of praying to a benevolent but irrationally unforgiving God. At first I would say that the symbolism was robust, but it distributed itself well over the different plot lines. The story dukes a bit between theist and atheist characters, but it doesn't cook in that pot for long. The patient received five stars because of its authenticity. It was raw. It was almost too scandalous, but the authors properly utilized their characters and tie up all story lines. This drama was sublime. Perhaps I will be seeing Stoli in my office soon.


5 stars.jpg

Dr. 2 with patient "Of Serpents and Sea Spray" by Rachel Bublitz

 
2 insignia.png
 
icon.png

Patient: Of Serpents and Sea Spray

Legal Guardian: Rachel Bublitz

Insurance: Paperkutz

Symptoms: Aching adventurism, imaginative escapism

Diagnosis: Reality aversion


Patient Description:

Enter the goddess Athena, stage right. The imagination of the piece was clear with pirates and Pegasus and train leaping, oh my. The young hero's youthful imagination was fresh and kept me sincerely interested within the fantasy conventions. "Mermaids, they are loving the great heroes, Petite Soeur." (Fille, Bublitz, 57). Iro fights and flights between an artistic reality and a sober one. The apache between the two was creative and cathartic and brought the work's theme above mere child's play. My only concern for this patient was the simpler language. I understand that the dialogue's circumstances contain a child protagonist, but some lines felt redundant and too babyish. Similarly, Athena sometimes resonates as amateur for her status. With an improvement of the language, I would have no problem recommending this story as a healthy, five star patient.


Four stars.png

Dr. 2 with patient "Juggling With Mr. Fields" by Jennifer O'Grady

 
2 insignia.png
 
juggling.png

Patient: Juggling With Mr. Fields

Legal Guardian: Jennifer O'Grady

Insurance: PagePay Plus

Symptoms: Riddled with realism.

Diagnosis: Retro Showbizickus


Patient Description:

I was an alien to the patient. I didn't know who W.C. Fields was. I thought the play's start was charming. The dialogue was healthy and seeming. Within the context, there was too much instruction. The drama was there, but I still felt like an alien to this gentleman and his struggle. I'm not sure what is or is not fictitious. I'd go to this performance if only to see the ol' boy juggle.


3 stars.png

Nurse 911 with patient "Vietnam Zippos" by J. Weintraub

 
2 insignia.png
 
lighter.png

Patient: Vietnam Zippos

Legal Guardian: J. Weintraub

Insurance: Bookmarx Medical

Symptoms: Inflammation of factoids, Signature Stage Styling

Diagnosis: Narrated Nihilism


Patient Description:

Our new patient is an antsy one, flicking his zippo casing on-and-off continuously in the waiting room. He was bothering the other patients who did not have zippos. When I had finally called his name, he appeared spooked, and in a knee-jerk like motion, rushed feverishly into the wing for diagnosis. The final evaluation was mild. The fact listing -of Zippos- is hit and miss in being interesting enough to actually attract my attention because the whole "badass soldier with a lighter" notion losses its novelty after a short while and appears to drone on with bits of information to drown it. 

Also, the ending seemed confusing. I thought we were talking about the history, as well as the intricacies of Zippos? Instead, the story ends on some moral high note of "World Peace is the answer". My point is that as the reader, I felt confused trying to bridge together what was handed to me. Where was the connection between the broad breakdown of Zippos, and the story's sudden shift towards an ending of "world peace"? The patient received a two star health rating.


two stars.png

Dr. 2 with patient "P.S. I Love Your Daughter" by Gary Cobin

 
2 insignia.png
 
shapes.png

Patient: P.S. I Love Your Daughter

Legal Guardian: Gary Cobin

Insurance: PagePay Plus

Symptoms: Jenny-Was-A-Friend-Of-Mine

Diagnosis: Daddy's Girl


Patient Description:

The patient's protagonist had me interested by the first beer. The intro had a very natural dialogue, even while being chopped with surprises. The company where the characters work was decorated in interesting symbolism that played into the script. Cobin's comedic character's really hit the spot. Unfortunately, when the story reached its revelations, it really handicapped itself with conventional delivery. The writing just did not create a believable dialogue when it needed it most. The story survives until the end, but I was surprised by the shift in acceptability because as I mentioned, the intro was healthy. In addition, Paul was way too dude, especially to his daughter. I understood he was a poor father, but he's still someone's greater. Wasn't he head of the company as well? Does a Sargent behave on the same level as his cadets? The story gets its zingers and all the boys figure out what to do. P.S. Derek's an idiot .


3 stars.png